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Graphic: DCPBW 2021 Coding Justice

DC Pro Bono Week 2021: Coding Justice

  • When: 25 October 2021, 3:30 to 4:30 pm
  • Where: Zoom
  • Cost: Free

The everyday lives of people in the United States and around the world are impacted and manipulated by the technology that surrounds us. That technology often is built on artificial intelligence and machine learning. The racial biases that are embedded in this technology lead to another, and rampant, level of systemic racism that is both insidious and hidden. Combatting this is the goal of algorithmic justice initiatives.

Join us for a discussion on algorithmic justice and the discriminatory use and impact of artificial intelligence and machine-learning technologies on communities of color and low-income communities with the District of Columbia. Attendees will learn why algorithmic justice is so important, how systemic racism permeates technology and how this technology plays into people’s daily lives. Attendees will hear about the imperfection of regulations around algorithmic justice and about the surveillance campaign in DC and why the public and legislators need to step in and create appropriate forums to have these discussions and not just bring sunlight to the use of surveillance, but give the public real input on whether and how these technologies should be used.

Panelists:  

  • Alan de Levie, Leader of DC Legal Hackers and Adjunct Associate Professor of Law at American University, Washington College of Law
  • Clare Garvie, Senior Associate with the Center on Privacy & Technology and Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown Law
  • Jason Tashea, Founder and director at Justice Codes and Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown Law
  • Matthew Bruckner, Associate Professor at Howard University School of Law
  • Nassim Moshiree, Policy Director, ACLU-DC
  • Valerie Schneider, Associate Professor of Law and Director of the Clinical Law Center at Howard University School of Law

Our conversation will be moderated by Vienna Thompkins, Data Analyst in the Science Program of the Center for Policing Equity.

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