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Litigation Skills Series: Trial Advocacy (2-day Training)

Litigation Skills Series: Trial Advocacy (2-day training)

Our Litigation Skills Series: Trial Advocacy training uses lecture, demonstration, and small-group sessions to teach the basics of opening statements, closing arguments, direct and cross examinations, impeachment, using documents—and more. It's two days full of training, provided by top-notch trial lawyers, and featuring lots of individual attention and feedback. For Washington Council of Lawyers members, the cost is just $85. For non-members, the cost is $125 for public interest and government lawyers, and $175 for those in the private sector. (Join Washington Council of Lawyers to take advantage of the discounted member tuition.) The cost includes lunch on both days. In additional to phenomenal lectures, useful demonstrations and constructive breakout sessions, we are pleased to feature the Honorable Ketanji Brown Jackson, United States District Judge for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. Scholarships are available due to the generosity of the D.C. Bar Foundation; please email our Executive Director, Nancy Lopez, for information on how to apply. CLE credit is pending and not guaranteed.

Best Practices In Pro Bono: Measuring Impact

Best Practices in Pro Bono: Measuring Impact

Best Practices in Pro Bono is a chance to share advice and tips for improving your pro bono program—with legal services, government, in-house, and law-firm pro bono coordinators from DC, Maryland, and Virginia. At Best Practices in Pro Bono: Measuring Impact, we'll examine how to measure those improvements and the overall effectiveness of your pro bono program—which can help inspire you and your volunteers to perform even more service. We'll have continental breakfast and casual conversation starting at 8:45 am; the facilitated discussion will take place from 9-10:15 am.

D.C. Bar 19th Annual Youth Law Fair

D.C. Bar 19th Annual Youth Law Fair

Join us in volunteering at the 19th Annual Youth Law Fair on Saturday, March 17. The Youth Law Fair inspires DC teens to think about using the law to promote social justice. Each year, DC Superior Court Judges, the D.C. Attorney General's office, the D.C. Bar Association, and other local organizations create a hands-on introduction to the law and courts for the next generation of lawyers. Highlights include a mock trial and courthouse tours. This is a great opportunity to teach the law to the next generation! This event is sponsored by the Superior Court of the District of Columbia and the Communities Office of the D.C. Bar. Additional details are below: Volunteers are encouraged to attend a one-hour briefing on Friday, March 16th at 6:00 pm at the D.C. Superior Court. Read the D.C. Bar's multimedia disclaimer. Who Can Volunteer for the Youth Law Fair? D.C. Bar members, staff and their immediate family members D.C. Bar Youth Law Fair exhibitors and their staff D.C. Bar Youth Law Fair committee members Any parent attending the Youth Law Fair with his or her child Any licensed lawyer who provides proof of membership in his/her state Bar other than the D.C. Bar Any judge, clerk, intern or staff member of the D.C. Court of Appeals, U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia,or the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit Law students from law schools located in the District of Columbia If you have any questions, please email the D.C. Bar Communities Office or call at (202) 626-3463.

Dinner & Discussion: Patty Mullahy Fugere & Shelley Broderick

Dinner & Discussion: Patty Mullahy Fugere & Shelley Broderick

Our next Dinner & Discussion honors Women's History Month with two of DC's legal luminaries: Patty Mullahy Fugere and Katherine S. "Shelley" Broderick. Patty Mullahy Fugere is soft-spoken but a force in the legal community. She has served for over 26 years as Executive Director of Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless, and she fights hard for her clients. She also helped create the DC Consortium of Legal Providers Community Listening Project; co-teaches a course on homelessness, poverty, and legal advocacy at Georgetown Law; and is involved with too many other organizations to name. Shelley Broderick has been Dean of University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law since 1999. She is a founder of the D.C. Consortium of Legal Services Providers, sits on the DC Access to Justice Commission, and serves on the Board of D.C. Appleseed. She also hosts Sound Advice, a cable TV show which provides information about legal issues affecting the District's most vulnerable residents. Patty and Shelley will discuss the passions that brought them to the law, their career paths, and the future of the legal profession and the delivery of legal services to the poor. Space is limited, so register early!

Making Low Bono Work

Making Low Bono Work

In 2015, we and the D.C. Bar co-sponsored a year-long series called Looking Into Low Bono—to explore ways to provide reduced-fee legal services for people of modest means. Out of this discussion, in 2016, came the the D.C. Reduced Fee Lawyer and Mediator Referral Service, known as DC Refers. In February of 2017, DC Refers launched the District's first online directory of reduced-fee lawyers to serve the legal needs of individuals with modest incomes. With this experience in mind, we're hosting a follow-up discussion: Making Low Bono Work. We'll offer information about a variety of low bono providers, including DC Refers, the DC Affordable Law Firm, Legal Counsel for the Elderly, Civil Justice Inc., and the DC Tenants' Rights Center. Our panel includes: Marc Borbely (Founder, D.C. Tenants’ Rights Center); Katie Dilks (Director, DC Affordable Law Firm; Steering Committee, DC Refers); Joseph Mack (Executive Director, Civil Justice Inc.); Ivy Smithers (Manager of Reduced Fee Panel, Legal Counsel for the Elderly); and Andrea Ferster (former D.C. Bar President; Steering Committee, DC Refers). We are cosponsoring this event with the Courts, Lawyers & Administration of Justice Community of the D.C. Bar, the Hispanic Bar Association of DC, and several other Communities of the D.C. Bar.

Litigation Skills Series: Moving Documents Into Evidence

Litigation Skills Series: Moving Documents into Evidence

A smoking gun helps your case only if you can get it into evidence. We'll show you how to do so at Litigation Skills Series: Moving Documents into Evidence. Superior Court Judge Todd Edelman and trial lawyer (and former administrative law judge) Daria Zane will teach the basics of admitting evidence—including business records, charts, photos, ledgers, drawings, letters, emails, and other documents. Then, you'll get on your feet and practice in small-group sessions, with feedback from experienced trial lawyers. This training is appropriate for public-interest, law firm, in-house, and government lawyers, as well as law students who have taken evidence and have trial-practice or mock-trial experience. CLE credit is pending but not guaranteed in CA, NY, and VA. Scholarships are available thanks to the generosity of the D.C. Bar Foundation. Email Nancy Lopez to apply.

Poverty Simulation (March 2018)

Poverty Simulation (March 2018)

The "Walk a Month" Poverty Simulation is a unique training opportunity for anyone who wants to better understand the hardships faced by low-income clients. Over the course of a few hours, we simulate a full month in the life of a typical low-income community; each week takes 15 to 20 minutes. Participants are divided into families; each family is placed in a specific set of circumstances based on real clients' experiences; and then you live the life of that family: working, obtaining benefits, buying food, taking your children to school, and staying in housing. We'll have volunteers on hand to portray merchants, employers, police officers, landlords, teachers, agency representatives, and others. When it's done, we'll discuss your experiences and how they reflect obstacles faced and decisions made by our clients. This interactive, immersive experience is appropriate for any lawyer interested in pro bono or public-interest work, board members of public-interest organizations, and law students. Whether you work at a law firm, nonprofit organization, government agency, or in-house legal department—or hope to do so after law school—you'll learn and grow from this unique simulation. We are cosponsoring the Poverty Simulation with American University, Washington College of Law; Catholic University, Columbus School of Law; George Washington University Law School; Georgetown University Law Center; Howard University School of Law; and the University of the District of Columbia, David A. Clarke School of Law. Thanks to American University for hosting us. The campus is two blocks from the AU/Tenleytown metro station on the red line; onsite, paid garage parking is available as well.