Menu

Surviving the Blizzard with No Heat

Low-income residents, including many East of the River, spent Snowzilla hunkered down under blankets or huddled around small space heaters. The Post describes the plight of many poor D.C. residents during the recent blizzard. For instance, a woman in Washington Highlands had to leave her oven running, with the door open, because the heat in her apartment has been broken all winter.

Lack of heat can result from several circumstances facing low-income residents. D.C.’s Office of People’s Counsel reports that low-income residents are often afraid to complain about their heating problems because they are worried that other social services will be discontinued if the city learns of their poor housing conditions. As explained by a housing lawyer with the Legal Aid Society for the District of Columbia, many low-income residents don’t complain to their landlords for fear of eviction. And some landlords just don’t properly maintain their properties—as we have previously discussed.

As a result, many of D.C.’s poorest residents who went without heat during this week’s historic snowstorm will continue to face similar unsafe conditions throughout the winter, even after the snow has melted.