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50 Years Of Leadership: Past President Paul Lee

50 Years of Leadership: Past President Paul Lee

Leadership starts from within. Paul Lee, board president from 2014-2016, knew that as he began his presidency during a time of growth. During his tenure, Washington Council of Lawyers expanded its staff and offerings of programming, trainings, events, and ways to come together to accomplish our mission in new and exciting ways.
50 Days For 50 Years Membership Drive

50 Days for 50 Years Membership Drive

Washington Council of Lawyers was founded in 1971, which makes this our 50th Anniversary year! To celebrate the occasion, we are holding a 50 Days for 50 Years Membership Drive, now through May 20.  It's the perfect time to join DC’s only public-interest bar association! Our membership is comprised of hundreds of attorneys and supporters from law firms, federal and local government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and law schools; we have one main thing in common — we care deeply about access to justice for our DC neighbors. If you do, too, we would appreciate your membership and welcome you officially into this wonderful community. As a member, you will enjoy: Member-only events Free or reduced rates at programs Networking opportunities Our Public Interest Jobs Clearinghouse emailed to you on the 1st and 15th of each month As an added bonus, when you join now, you will receive a two-year membership for the cost of one, effectively a 50% reduced rate! Act quickly! The 2-year offer for new members ends on May 19. Join today, and then plan to meet other members at Lawyers with a Fine Palate, a virtual wine-tasting event to welcome all of our members. It's the perfect way to celebrate your official membership! Join us today!

Government Pro Bono Roundtable (2021)

Government Pro Bono Roundtable (2021)

On Thursday, February 4, 2021, Washington Council of Lawyers hosted its annual Government Pro Bono Roundtable.  To meet the great need for pro bono lawyers in the District, our expert panel discussed ways to find pro bono projects, presented legal considerations to avoid conflicts of interest, and connected government lawyers with the vast network of support and mentorship available.
50 Years Of Leadership: Past President David Steib

50 Years of Leadership: Past President David Steib

As we celebrate 50 years of working to ensure that our legal system treats everyone fairly, regardless of money, position, or power, we recognize and appreciate the leaders that moved us forward in the fight for access to justice for all. Without the stalwart leadership, unwavering commitment, and insightful guidance of our past board presidents, we would not be the organization we are today. Over the next months, we will highlight some of our past presidents and take a look at the state of the world during their tenure and the initiatives and priorities they oversaw that helped us grow. Our first highlighted past president is our most recent past president. David Steib was board president from 2018-2020, a tumultuous time for our country.
Language Access Program Of The DC Office Of Human Rights Releases 2019 Compliance Review

Language Access Program of the DC Office of Human Rights Releases 2019 Compliance Review

The Language Access Program of the District of Columbia Office of Human Rights (OHR) recently released its 2019 Compliance Review.  The report, found on the Office’s website, serves as a valuable resource to anyone interested in learning more about DC’s limited English proficient population, about the city government’s obligations under the DC Language Access Act of 2004 (the Act), and about the performance of city government agencies to meet those obligations. For public interest and pro bono lawyers, it is important to understand where agencies stand with regard to language access. If your housing client is limited English proficient, you may want to review the language access score for the DC Housing Authority (if your client is in public housing) or for the DC Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs (if your client needs a housing code inspection). This is just one example of the myriad ways that legal services clients interact with DC government agencies. 
Best Practices In Pro Bono: Beyond Trump, What Now?

Best Practices in Pro Bono: Beyond Trump, What Now?

  • February 3, 2021
  • Blog
On Thursday, January 28, 2021, Washington Council of Lawyers reflected upon pro bono legal services and what changes, if any, have transpired after the historical 46th Presidential inauguration. The central question of this discussion was what the new administration might mean in providing pro bono legal services in the District.
Going Public: Tips On Navigating A Career In Public Interest Law

Going Public: Tips on Navigating a Career in Public Interest Law

  • February 2, 2021
  • Blog
On Wednesday, January 27, 2021, Washington Council of Lawyers hosted an in-depth discussion on how to navigate to a public-interest career, how to be successful once you get there, and how to thrive in an often emotionally taxing career path. It was an inspiring conversation with concrete tips to help guide those in pursuit of meaningful public interest law careers.
Spotlight On Evictions With Emily Benfer

Spotlight On Evictions with Emily Benfer

By Heather Krick On Wednesday, December 9, 2020, we hosted Spotlight on Evictions, a virtual conversation with Emily Benfer, Chair of the ABA's Covid-19 Taskforce on Evictions. First, the program opened with remarks from current ABA President Patricia Lee Refo. Tricia acknowledged that the United States is facing an unprecedented need for pro bono lawyering and reminded us that lawyers can help limit the number of evictions. She discussed the ABA's advocacy in Congress for a renewed moratorium on evictions. The draft stimulus bill, which Congress is set to pass shortly, includes an extension of the national eviction moratorium through January 2021. She also thanked the many lawyers who have taken on pro bono cases during the COVID-19 pandemic. Then, Taryn Wilgus Null, government attorney and member of the Washington Council of Lawyers Board of Directors, moderated a discussion with Emily about the eviction crisis, which already existed pre-pandemic and has only been exacerbated during the pandemic. The facts and context Emily provided are sobering. Before the novel coronavirus pandemic began, about 50% of the renter population (or 20.8 million families) were paying 30% of their income to rent. Seven evictions were filed every minute when the unemployment rate was at 4.7%. Racially discriminatory housing practices resulted in a lack of wealth accumulation among people of color who have approximately 1/12 of the wealth accumulation of their white counterparts. Emily highlighted the purpose and effect of eviction moratoriums. Currently, Washington, DC has a moratorium on evictions, but 31 states do not have strong protections in place. Earlier in the pandemic, in May, 43 states had protections in place against evictions. This is important because eviction filings spike within weeks after moratoriums end and protections cease. In some cities, filings rose 385%. The mere filing of an eviction case can lead to decreased housing stability. Regardless of the outcome of the case, the filing can lower credit scores, hinder loan eligibility, or create barriers to future employment. Connections Between Evictions and Health Inequity Emily then explained that the single greatest predictor of eviction is the presence of a child in the home. As a result, families are often the ones evicted from their homes. This can have negative consequences on health well into the future. She noted evictions are associated with health conditions in children such as emotional trauma, risk of chronic disease in adulthood, decreased life expectancy, setbacks in education, and food insecurity. Some conditions shown in women who are evicted include drug-use and related harms, pre-term pregnancy, and physical or sexual assault. She went on to demonstrate how evictions are also correlated with an increase in physical and mental health conditions, including higher mortality rates, higher blood pressure, respiratory conditions, sexually transmitted infections, depression, anxiety, mental health hospitalizations, and suicides. Additionally, evictions cause families to seek alternatives which include staying with relatives or friends. Emily elucidated how an increase in home size by just two people can double the exposure risk of respiratory infections like the novel coronavirus. An overcrowded residential environment also makes it difficult to adhere to CDC recommended COVID-19 protocols, such as increased hand washing, self-quarantining, wearing clean masks, sheltering in place, and social distancing. With a link between moratorium lifts and an increase in mortality rates, evictions frustrate efforts to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Effects are stronger in states with weaker moratoriums. Some experts estimate that between May and September of 2020, evictions led to an additional 430,000 preventable cases of COVID-19 and 10,700 preventable deaths. Emily further explained that people of color are much more likely to be affected by evictions and their accompanying health impacts. During this past summer, African American renters had low or slight confidence in their ability to pay the next month's rent compared to white renters who consistently had high confidence in their ability to make rent payments. Black and Hispanic adults are dying at the same rates as white people who are a decade or older than them. What can we do? Emily had several suggestions for how lawyers can get involved. We need to freeze the initiation stage of evictions and ensure that the freeze applies to all renters. We can increase access to counsel for tenants in eviction cases. Without counsel, winnable cases more frequently default in the landlord's favor. We can create diversion programs that include a right to counsel. While there are rent relief programs available, the demand is so high that the funds get depleted within one day and sometimes in hours. Programs with funds still available are setting the bar too high for those in need to access the funds. Two actions that lawyers can take are to 1) take a pro bono eviction case, and 2) advocate for better fair housing policies. Emily highlighted one tax attorney in Texas who was so moved by the situation that they started taking pro bono cases and prevented four thousand evictions alone. After the pandemic is over, the work will have just begun. Legal representation in housing court can make a huge difference. In 2019, approximately 84% of tenants represented by counsel remained in their homes, and default judgments dropped by 34%. Pro bono lawyers will be more important than ever in helping families maintain secure housing. Hope for the Future Hope in this dark moment comes from remembering that many lawyers have already taken on pro bono cases and are continuing…

The Year In Review: 2020 Advocacy Initiatives

The Year In Review: 2020 Advocacy Initiatives

As the year draws to a close, we look back on our advocacy efforts supporting the Washington Council of Lawyers' mission of a fair justice system for everyone, regardless of money, position, or power. During this challenging year, we have taken action on the issues on which we have a longstanding track record of leadership and advocacy. As the pandemic began to affect our most vulnerable citizens and their access to legal services and the courts, we also swiftly pivoted to address these new challenges in the context of our ongoing work in improving access to justice for all individuals.
2020 Awards Ceremony

2020 Awards Ceremony

Our virtual 2020 Awards Ceremony brought all the warmth and inspiration our public interest community brings every day to helping those in need. We came together to give a special thank you to our award recipients for the work that they do to serve our community.
2020 Presidents Award For Public Service: Paul Smith

2020 Presidents Award for Public Service: Paul Smith

Paul Smith has been recognized as one of the "nation's elite litigators," whose "profound commitment to advancing civil liberties make him a legal force to be reckoned with," as well as someone who is "down to earth but also brilliant." Washington Council of Lawyers knows him to be all these things, as well as our long-time board and honorary board member, former President, and frequent guest speaker at our events.  We are so honored to recognize Paul with our 2020 Presidents Award for Public Service.
2020 Government Pro Bono Award Recipient Josephine Bahn

2020 Government Pro Bono Award Recipient Josephine Bahn

Josephine (Jo) Bahn takes her commitment to service very seriously. Although early in her career, Jo has already made a significant impact in the legal field and her community. We are excited to recognize her many contributions to her community with the 2020 Government Pro Bono Award.
2020 Law Firm Award Recipient: Fried Frank

2020 Law Firm Award Recipient: Fried Frank

Washington Council of Lawyers has selected Fried Frank as our 2020 Law Firm Award Recipient. We are thrilled to recognize the firm's outstanding dedication to pro bono and express our appreciation for your long-term support of our mission to promote pro bono service and public-interest law.
DC Pro Bono Week 2020: Recap

DC Pro Bono Week 2020: Recap

DC Pro Bono Week 2020 is a wrap, but the inspiration to make a difference in our community and the celebration of pro bono service continues. We know the work doesn't stop, and the pandemic has created a legal needs crisis the likes of which are unprecedented. As lawyers, we have a duty and obligation to help bridge the access to justice gap. Whether it's by taking on a pro bono case, volunteering for an advice and referral clinic, contributing to systemic advocacy, or financially supporting a legal services organization, we can all do something for the public good.
DC Pro Bono Week 2020 Profiles: Complete Set

DC Pro Bono Week 2020 Profiles: Complete Set

During DC Pro Bono Week 2020, we celebrated lawyers who made a profound difference in the lives of their pro bono clients despite unique challenges. We hope they have inspired you to take on your own pro bono case.
DC Pro Bono Week 2020: Kids Can Help Too!

DC Pro Bono Week 2020: Kids Can Help Too!

America is known as a nation of immigrants. It is a country that prides itself on being a melting pot and for welcoming people from many different countries, races, and religions, all hoping to find freedom, new opportunities, and a better way of life.  A Conversation With Kids About Immigrants and Fairness was an event hosted by Washington Council of Lawyers on October 27, 2020, to talk to younger children about why people come to America, the challenges they face, the injustices they overcome, and what lawyers can do to assist the immigrant community.
DC Pro Bono Week 2020: Coding Justice Examines Engaging Clients Remotely

DC Pro Bono Week 2020: Coding Justice Examines Engaging Clients Remotely

Meeting clients where they are at is one of the most essential lawyering skills, made only more essential in response to the COVID-19 public health crisis. On Monday, October 26, 2020, as part of DC Pro Bono Week 2020, the Washington Council of Lawyers hosted Coding Justice, a panel discussion on how to best serve clients remotely and keep them engaged. 
DC Pro Bono Week 2020: Pro Bono Goes Local Kicks Off The Celebration

DC Pro Bono Week 2020: Pro Bono Goes Local Kicks Off The Celebration

There is a tremendous need for pro bono service in the District and there is a myriad of opportunities to get involved and make a direct impact in our community. On Monday, October 26, 2020, the Washington Council of Lawyers kicked off DC's Annual Pro Bono Week with the Chief Judges of the D.C. Courts, inspiring pro bono lawyers, and pivotal information about ways to help those in our community address legal needs.
Racial Justice Series: Racism By Design Was A Wide-Reaching Discussion

Racial Justice Series: Racism By Design Was A Wide-Reaching Discussion

Racial segregation persists in America. On Tuesday, October 20, the Washington Council of Lawyers sponsors a timely discussion among a panel of experts examining both the historical and the present dimensions of racial segregation in housing. Specifically, the panelists discussed the myriad ways federal, state, and local policies have promoted structural racial inequality in education, public health, voting, criminal justice, and more.
Pro Bono Week 2020 Profile: Arnold & Porter Partners With Legal Aid To Tackle Covid-19 Unemployment Crisis

Pro Bono Week 2020 Profile: Arnold & Porter Partners with Legal Aid to Tackle Covid-19 Unemployment Crisis

The numbers are shocking. Within two weeks of Mayor Bowser declaring a public health emergency back in mid-March, nearly 28,000 District of Columbia workers had filed claims for unemployment insurance (UI) – more claims than had been filed in the entire previous fiscal year.  And that was just the beginning.  As of September 22, more than 145,000 jobless workers have filed UI claims in the District, a historic wave of unemployment. In response, Legal Aid has mobilized significant internal and pro bono resources to meet the increased need for legal help. A team from Arnold & Porter stepped up to provide significant assistance in the effort to protect these workers.
Pro Bono Week 2020 Profile: Brad Guest – Helping Entrepreneurs Achieve Their Life’s Dream

Pro Bono Week 2020 Profile: Brad Guest – Helping Entrepreneurs Achieve Their Life’s Dream

Brad Guest volunteers his time to support D.C.'s small businesses because for the clients "this is often their life's dream, something they've poured their time and energy into often exclusively for a long time. Receiving pro bono legal advice may be the only opportunity for these individuals to get answers to questions that could not only impact their business, but also their personal risk and liability."
Racial Justice Series Part 1: Racism By Design

Racial Justice Series Part 1: Racism By Design

Join us for the first of this year's three-part Racial Justice Series examining institutional racism and how to advocate for real and lasting change for our clients.  At our first event, our panel will examine both the history and the present reality of housing segregation and how federal, state, and local policies have affected and advanced systems of structural racial inequality in education, public health, voting, criminal justice, and more.
Pro Bono Week 2020 Profile: Williams & Connolly Team – Helping DC Families Secure Homes For Future Holidays

Pro Bono Week 2020 Profile: Williams & Connolly Team – Helping DC Families Secure Homes for Future Holidays

In December 2018, residents across the District were preparing for the holidays and enjoying the comfort of their warm homes. However, for those living in a Brightwood Park apartment complex, a fire broke out leaving six families without a place to call home. The children who lost their homes in the fire that night were not only traumatized – their health had been endangered by unsafe housing. Children's Law Center attorneys and investigators, led by Senior Supervising Attorney Kathy Zeisel, filed a complaint and secured temporary Red Cross shelter for the six families. But in an atypical moment for our organization, we brought in Williams & Connolly to co-counsel, knowing that an unusual case this size needed pro bono help from a team of fierce civil litigators. That team included firm associates Tracey A. Fung, Michaela Wilkes Klein and Tony Sheh, with partner Andy Keyes providing support and supervision.
Pro Bono Week 2020 Profiles: Kristin Whidby – Navigating A Path To Safety With DC Volunteer Lawyers Project

Pro Bono Week 2020 Profiles: Kristin Whidby – Navigating a Path to Safety with DC Volunteer Lawyers Project

Kristin Whidby is not a typical senior litigation associate. She handles complex IP, real estate, and securities litigation matters for a wide range of clients, but she does much more. She's also the mother of four young children, and in recent months has added the demands of managing remote learning to her other parental responsibilities. On top of all that, Kristin has continued to be an active volunteer for the DC Volunteer Lawyers Project, providing direct representation to clients and serving on its Junior Board.
Pro Bono Week 2020 Profile: Anam Rahman – Making A Long-Term Difference In The Lives Of Immigrants

Pro Bono Week 2020 Profile: Anam Rahman – Making A Long-Term Difference In The Lives of Immigrants

Anam Rahman was instilled with the values of philanthropy, altruism, and empathy from a young age. As a fluent Spanish speaker, Anam has been volunteering at D.C.-based immigration clinics like the D.C. Bar Pro Bono Center's Immigration Legal Advice & Referral Clinic and the Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc.'s Board of Immigration Appeals Pro Bono Project for years. "Finding the time to volunteer and do pro bono work reminds me of why I became an immigration attorney in the first place: to help people and families," Anam said.
Pro Bono Week 2020 Profiles: Ellen Bass – Representing Unaccompanied Children Seeking Safety

Pro Bono Week 2020 Profiles: Ellen Bass – Representing Unaccompanied Children Seeking Safety

Globally, 2020 has been a difficult year and the immigration legal field has been no exception. Changes, such as new asylum rules, attempts to raise fees and alter filing procedures, and developments in case law, have made an already complex area of law much harder to navigate. The majority of unaccompanied children lack representation in their immigration cases. Representing unaccompanied immigrant children can be complicated, as the majority of these children come to the United States after surviving trauma and leaving families and communities behind to seek safety from unthinkable situations. Further, these children are placed in removal proceedings with no guaranteed access to counsel or an adult to speak on their behalf. The COVID-19 pandemic continues to add further stress on this already vulnerable population, as low-income living and working circumstances increase the risk of contracting the virus, children lose access to supports in educational settings, caretakers are unemployed, and community supports are more difficult to access. Ellen Bass has come out of retirement to help these children find peace and safety.